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Events

May

8

Sat

Online Cocktail Making Class at Run Rabbit Run

Online Cocktail Making Class with Run Rabbit Run

6pm

Poblacion, Makati

  For those wanting the full cocktail at home experience, Run Rabbit Run will be hosting a special virtual class at 6PM on Saturday May 8, 2021. It is free to join, for those interested to participate, please call or text 0926 986 8786 to purchase a kit with all the ingredients to make the cocktails with Run Rabbit Run

Poblacion, Makati

Online Cocktail Making Class with Run Rabbit Run

For those wanting the full cocktail at home experience, we will be host a special virtual class at 6pm on Saturday 08 May 2021. It is free to join, should you wish to participate please call or text us on 09269868786 to purchase a kit with all the ingredients to make the cocktails with us. Run Rabbit Run, has been at the forefront of elevating the local cocktail scene in Manila. Since opening their doors in May 2018, they have gone on to win multiple awards including Philippine Tatler Best Bar. When the pandemic hit, the bar pivoted to offer an online cocktail delivery programme and virtual classes which saw them remain busy in 2020. Not one to shy away when things get touch, Run Rabbit Run have even bigger plans for 2021.

May

13

Thur

do it (MCAD Manila)

Museum of Contemporary Art and Design (MCAD) Manila Exhibition Launch

facebook.com/MCADManila
instagram.com/mcadmanila
twitter.com/mcadmanila
mcadmanila.org.ph

do it (MCAD Manila)

The Museum of Contemporary Art and Design (MCAD) Manila, in collaboration with Independent Curators International (ICI) New York, will launch do it (MCAD Manila) online on 13 May 2021, an exhibition where written instructions by artists are interpreted anew. How this project reimagines the exhibition format as flexible and open-ended is a result of a 1993 conversation in Paris among curator Hans Ulrich Obrist and artists Christian Boltanski and Bertrand Lavier, and has become the world’s longest running curatorial project since. MCAD joins more than 50 institutions that have re-created the exhibition and will hold its first appearance in the Philippines. In this iteration, MCAD partners with local artists, community groups and its online audience. As a response to global stay at home orders, do it (MCAD Manila) will run both online and on-site. do it (MCAD Manila) launches online through the museum’s social media channels and website on 13 May 2021. The public is invited to participate by responding to instructions from different artists, which will be released by MCAD throughout the exhibition run. do it (MCAD Manila) invites local artists MM Yu, Russ Ligtas, Madge Reyes, Lourd de Veyra, Manix Abrera, Manny Montelibano, Mark Salvatus, and chef Miko Calo for a special presentation in interpreting instructions by Cao Fei, Jerome Bel, Rivane Neuenschwander, Liam Gillick, Hannah Weinberger, Robert Ashley, and others.

May

15

Sat

art/n23 – Terracotta

4pm

Sharon RAFOLS & Hemrod DURAN demonstrate hand building and wheel throwing techniques to create terracotta pieces made of locally sourced clay. Join PFAStudios.

art/n23 – Terracotta

Dumaguete artists show and tell how terracotta and pottery survives in the island of Negros on Saturday, May 15 at 4:00 PM live @58 E.J. Blanco studios. Join PFAStudios.

May

15

Sat

Deadlocks: Solo Exhibit Opening

5pm

Experimental tattoo artist Deadlocks opens his first solo show. Join PFAStudios.

Deadlocks: Solo Exhibit Opening

Experimentalist tattoo artist Dyck Cediño aka Deadlocks opens his studio for the public to contemplate sketchbooks and drawings from 2017 to the present. Soundscapes by the artist begin at 5:00PM.

Gallery &
Museum Exhibitions

Cultural Center of the Philippines

Cultural Cache Online: Episode 3 featuring “Dynamic Growth”

May 7

Cultural Center of the Philippines

Cultural Cache Online: Episode 3 featuring “Dynamic Growth”

May 7, 2021

by Eduardo Castrillo, with Ovvian Castrillo Video launch on May 7, 2021 at https://www.facebook.com/ccpvamd In Cultural Cache Online: Episode 3, Ovvian Castrillo presents the work of her father, Eduardo Castrillo, titled "Dynamic Growth," which is located at the CCP's Bulwagang Carlos V. Francisco (Little Theater Lobby). Cultural Cache Online is a monthly video series that introduces artworks from the CCP Visual Arts Collection to the digital audience with the help of specially selected resource persons. A first for the CCP, it aims to supplement existing research on Philippine art history by featuring artworks and the artists who made them, supported by archival materials such as photos and documents related to the artworks, artists and their contexts. A video playlist of all the videos in the series can be found here: https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PL7cRhLxY2tOwF9W5aBUuQdeJt8GS-2aCG

Galerie Roberto

Binong Javier: Drop of Life

Galerie Roberto

Binong Javier: Drop of Life

Gallery Walkthrough (DROP OF LIFE - Binong Javier) | Galerie Roberto "This all originated from a single drop. From this drop sprung forth colors that gave life. Each drop coalesces into our memories, our trajectories, our memories, and our experiences. The bitter, the impenetrable, the insurmountable, all insight. Each drop is a symbol of a moment. Together, these paint a masterpiece of what it means to be alive. Drops of color, drops of voyages, drops of life." Galerie Roberto is pleased to announce abstract artist Binong Javier's 2nd solo show entitled "Drop of Life". The exhibit runs from March 20 to April 2, 2021. To receive the catalogue, send us a private message. Music: Lonely - LoFi Boom Bap Chill TType Beat (Ras-Hop beats)

CANVAS

Vignettes

Mar 16

CANVAS

Vignettes

March 16, 2021

A "vignette" is a short account or episode that seeks to capture a brief moment in time. They can stand on their own, or also be a part of a larger story. In this show, some of the country's best contemporary artists interpret a few of former history professor Roberto Galang's vignettes on selected episodes from 1521 to the present. On their own, the art and words present facts, observations, trivia and reflections. But, they are also part of a more consequential narrative that is a major chapter not only in our country’s story, but of world history itself. Ferdinand Magellan's arrival in the Philippines marked the first circumnavigation of the world, a monumental achievement that greatly expanded Europe’s geographic knowledge by confirming the size of the globe’s circumference and conclusively validating the fact of the earth’s roundness. It deepened linkages between different cultures and civilizations, ultimately leading to accomplishments and expansions in commerce, science, the arts and religion that would not have been possible otherwise. For these reasons, Magellan’s landing in the Philippines has been described by some historians as marking the first globalization of the planet. And, for the Philippines, it changed and redefined the trajectory of our development and place in the world. As a country and as a people - from our faiths to language to education to politics and to our very culture - we were and are forever changed. The vignettes also hint at other broader issues: the roles of ideas, words and language; the dual-edged nature and clash of religion and ambitions; the importance of memory; the underappreciated role of women; nature and human progress; the influences of image and perception; creation, destruction and evolution; and the power of dreams, stories and imagination, among other themes. 500 years is an undeniably significant milestone calling not so much for celebration, but for sincere reflection. It is not an easy task. The diversity and breadth of events and subjects are obviously impossible to comprehensively cover, so “Vignettes” is simply CANVAS’ modest contribution to the discourse. We see this as an opportunity to appreciate our triumphs and achievements, as well as to acknowledge and learn from past failures and missteps. If there is but one lesson to take, for us it is this: the Quincentenniale should be a reminder to all of us that, even in these difficult times, we need to find the discipline to stop and look back, to appreciate and learn, continuously and deliberately. 500 years is far too long a period to wait to do these things. Click here: https://www.tumbatumba.ph/quincentenniale

Art Verité Gallery

Procession of the Slightly Mad

May 6-15

Art Verité Gallery

Procession of the Slightly Mad

6-15 May 2021

S-Ann Ch'i | Brian Uhing Art Verité presents the two-artist show, Procession of the Slightly Mad by Brian Uhing and S-Ann Ch’i. The exhibition is an unlikely pairing of two creative trajectories: Uhing hews closely to figurative surrealism while S-Ann Ch’i embodies the tenets of gestural abstraction. Their different temperaments notwithstanding, the exhibition showcases how generative and fruitful it is to think beyond the concerns of theme but instead focus on more subtle traits of the painting medium, such as energy, exuberance, and engagement. For more information, visit http://artverite.net/

Primo Marella Gallery

Ruben Pang – True Solarization

Feb 25 - May 20

Primo Marella Gallery

Ruben Pang – True Solarization

25 February- 20 May 2021

Primo Marella Gallery is pleased to announce “True solarization” Ruben Pang’ third solo exhibition at the gallery in Milan. TRUE SOLARIZATION "We do not know where the great light was born, whether from the outside or from the inside, and when it has disappeared, we say: it was interior, yet it was not interior. There is no need to ask where it appeared, because there is no point of origin here; it does not start from one place to go to another but appears and does not appear. Therefore, we must not chase it, but wait quietly until it reveals itself, as the eye waits for the sun to rise, which rises to the horizon and offers itself to our eyes to be contemplated. " Plotinus, Enneade V 5,8 (On Beauty) Sigmund Freud defines artistic talent as flexibility of removal because according to his thesis the unconscious is more easily accessible for the artist and therefore can proceed in this dimension between the conscious and the unconscious to intercept his artistic intuitions. The creative act becomes a pendular movement between conscious and unconscious impulses, while serving as a gradual process of raising one’s consciousness. Everything is based on the idea of a creative chaos as the true origin of artistic creation. Pang's works are often containers of this chaos where we find an entropic force, the fundamental law of nature on which the ecosystem and therefore life depends. Entropy was used by Rudolph Clausius in 1850, in the second law of thermodynamics, to indicate the correlation between physical state transition and energy production. “What is counterintuitive about painting, is that you are choosing to suspend movement, to arrest chaos, to defy gravity, to levitate. When you lift a brush away from a painting, where you decide to stop blending, when you decide to leave passages to dry, is where the attention and focus needs to be, even more so than the application, gesture, or movement. Paint being moved around, for me, is experienced through the skin and muscles, but choosing when to stop, is done with the eyes and a conversation with the heart.” Clausius verified that at each change of state, with the consequent production or dispersion of energy, there is an increasing disorder in the structure of matter. According to this theory, the same word entropy was then applied in other fields, from mathematical theory of probability to information theory, psycholinguistics, and quantum physics. The writer Thomas Pynchon gives us his definition of entropic disorder correlated with communication, coming to theorize a progressive loss of meaning of words because it is emptied of substance by excessively focusing on concept. It can reasonably be said art potentially loses its own sense if it progressively overworked and emptied. In this land between chaos and potential opportunities, Pang creates his own universe and reminds us: “You can create a world, but you can't shape everything.” The communicative emotion that he transmits to us through his paintings reflect the structures of language in unlikely associations. Similarly, we use slang/expressions in everyday communication that oppose grammatical rules, within painting, elements of disorder lubricate the transition from information into messages. Pang approaches his painting, specifically in his relationship with color, assigning them personalities and associations on top of their technical qualities, with whimsically misaligned elements to strengthen a reception of potential passages the composition can embark on. “I tend not to think of colors in terms of their harmony or combinations that are known to create a certain effect. My experience of color is that each tint, shade, tone, and hue have a personal antecedent. In End of School for instance, I thought of flooding the atmosphere with the colors that correspond to the scent, packaging and scenes associated with a menthol cigarette: the 1990s, nostalgia, benign teenage delinquency. It was meant to simulate the “haze” of looking back in time. Every color is a memory, an aspiration, an attitude. And I prefer to think of the forms and colors of a painting as a collection of attitudes.” According to the well-known art critic Greenberg, theorist of American modernism, the form of a work of art would be the state in which it leaves the norms and conventions of the artistic medium. For Greenberg, the artist seems to work against the resistance of his own medium and under his pressure and it is therefore assumed that, consciously, he dominates its conventions. The artist produces images, forms, narrations but starting from the deconstruction of his experience, of his past, of what disturbs him, of outdated tragedies and hidden fears, casting the shadow of a memory that seems to come from nowhere. “Showing up and being honest with yourself leads to a dialogue between previous scenarios in a painting—it is a dialogue between your experience with the material, the flux and volatility of oils and pigments, and the desire to have the fruits of opposing ideals; to keep the happy accident while realizing a vision, to be direct in intention, yet moved and deceived by illusions, to find a limit, effortlessly. The nature of the painting game is that as new things develop, other things yield. At times, I feel an “opening” in a developing picture, a magnetism towards something mysterious, refractory, or suspended. If I put aside my initial ambitions for the composition, I am convinced that the painting is painting itself.” During this process of deconstruction and construction of his works, Pang does not set limits, and through a stream of consciousness, he creates layers of paint, modifies the pre-existing ones, and redefines their contours spontaneously. Evidently, for Pang, the painting frame, its outline, is a limes, a border that separates two lands and the tangible sign (often identified with a stone) that defines what is inside and outside. Limiting is an act of definition, it is an act of border creation between lived reality and its representation, in a nutshell, it is the most archaic manifestation of individual control and of the creation of identity. In this reading, control and identity therefore seem to correspond as if they were an obsessive response to the question: who are we? “Do you hunt ideas down or seed them? Do you need to shape every form or allow things to develop without meddling? Is there space in the painting for anything other than yourself?” We often have the impression that to better see the outside world and consequently our life, we must move away from everyday life, from reality. According to Foucault, the hermeneutical approach towards a work of art is characterized by the search for what has not been said, for what is hidden from the evidence of the sign and which would constitute the ultimate truth of the work of art. Pang, on the other hand, promotes research that is based on the creative moment and analyzes its relationships: the relationship between the author and the work, the relationship between the author and the environment and the relationship between the author, the work and his time. “We are fortunate now, to have immediate access to the expanse of art history, and in a sense, we are always time-traveling. I find it comforting that the lessons and contributions of artists who lived centuries apart, for instance, Bruegel, Rubens and David Reed, are intimately present and accessible simultaneously.” “A question that painters are asked often is ‘How do you know when a painting is done?’. You recognize something that you’ve never seen before, not through its image, but by how far you are displaced internally—depersonalization is my compass.” Depersonalization in this context refers to the detachment and letting go of the initial intentions or ambitions for the artwork, by oscillating his focus between a vision in his mind’s eye and the physical situation of paint’s volatility, recognizing that the nature of painting is unprecise in translating thought, but presents several opportunities for what he considers magic. Relationship between artist and environment: “Skywriters and Prism are two paintings of the same dimensions made with similar materials but with a drastically different result. In Skywriters, I painted in a very small space, almost seated at a desk all the time—i wanted to give the effect as if it were painted by a gnome, as if the frame of 60 x 75 cm was further than the horizon. It was also the first painting done after moving from Singapore to Sardinia, and it was done as a kind of initiation, “breaking in” and trying to find my footing in a new space. Prism was realized as a counterpoint to larger paintings of 220 x 150 cm, in the context of a larger studio that I had set-up, over the months. To reinforce the contrasts in approach from other works, I only used a large brush throughout the process and refrained from delineating any shape or figures within a single movement. I approached it as if I were allergic to the marks that could give away a human touch or personality.” Pang’s approach to artistic creation is like a stream of consciousness, something that the artist is unable to stem but which is composed on the substrate as a trace of his experience. The generating intuition, the creative act, the personal content, the psychological and human implications are the basis of his artistic poetics: man is at the center of his universe; his system of relations between the single components of a work is always sought because this structuralism is indicative of the research that pervades his poetics. Structuralism is a methodology that has established itself since the early twentieth century in various sciences, based on the assumption that each object of study constitutes a structure, that is, it constitutes an organic and global whole whose elements have no autonomous functional value but assume it within distinctive relations of each element with respect to the others of the whole. The structural interest that outlines the conformation of a work in compositions such as Familial TiesSolace and Individuality and End of School, abandons geometric lines and constructions to open up to Classical planes and compositions. This material structuralism is also witnessed in Michelangelo's work, The Last Judgment. However, Pang moves towards the direction of the eighteenth-century painter Alessandro Magnasco, where there is a sign of ambiguity in his compositions and forms, giving us the impression of an animation that starts from within. We find in many of Pang's works a dialectic of opposites, a dialectic understood within the pictorial corpus in the making, with the colors and stratifications of architecture that guides us in this sense of an absence-presence. “In the painting world, I get to insist that flesh becomes sky, earth can be inhaled. In Prism, for instance, I would like to create a sense of pressurized atmosphere, flesh and soil form a throat or a door. In End of School, liquid walls encompass a glacial anthropomorphic tree seeded from fire and children. In Familial Ties and History of Defensive Gardens respectively, a head in the former and a torso in the latter, becomes a portal. In Choleric, and in Ionosphere, what is usually regarded as the background of a painting becomes the protagonist of the scene. Here the play in composition is informed by music—jazz drums. The emphasis on the upbeat in jazz is transposed into the composition of painting: let space be the start of the show, let absence be the fulcrum.” In Pang’s paintings it may seem that there is an indetermination of the forms, but his language serves to delineate of the conflict of a lived experience. It appears external and superior forces act to outline his subjects in the flux of painterly events. We see a parallelism in the film L'Eclisse by Antonioni, the story of an unlikely love between two protagonists who live in a world without moral or psychological determination, where everything is independent of individual will or any logic of cause and effect. This allegory is a critique of our society. Pang's paintings share a common denominator of being pervaded by a vital force engulfed by the reality that surrounds it, as if magical currents bind human subjects to the objects that surround them. It does so as a gesture of provocation, not an end in itself, but as a gesture of stimulation towards a new level of cognitive reasoning of reality, as found in the work of the Dada artists who altered the order and physical size of words. As Whitehead states in Adventures of Ideas: “There is in every period a general form of the form of thought: and like the air we breathe that form is so translucent, so pervasive and so evidently necessary, that, with only an effort extreme we manage to become aware of it. " Thus, Pang's vision reflects a combination of painterly traditions, remote cultural influences, scholastic attitude, and technical needs and is at the same time, the daughter of an era, of a general feeling that brings the viewer of the work, like a theatrical performance, towards "consciously growing self-suggestions". Similarly, the repertoire of epic literature also aims to identify the viewer with the characters represented. Greek tragedy is based on the contrast between the character and the actions of the hero, between his moral greatness and his senseless, often self-destructive deeds. This contrast does not develop to a real conflict because the hero, an unconscious victim of his own fate, transgresses the divine order only when it is already in progress. Pang in his narration causes the hero to stop a moment before his annihilation, before the spiritual mystical fire envelops him; as in Lunar Snow, which is the successor to End of School, where he crosses the boundaries of narration to head towards new horizons via simplification and emptying, a distillation of the chromatic chart to include only that which is necessary. In a mannerist thought of the relationship between man and environment, Pang’s varying works are united (and dominated) by ambiguity—the ambiguity of human existence and the double nature of man. Text by Lorenzo Belli

UP Vargas Museum

Homecoming/Eventually

Apr 27 - Jun 4

UP Vargas Museum

Homecoming/Eventually

27 April to 4 June 2021

The UP Vargas Museum, in partnership with Gallery VER, Silverlens, Angsuvarnsiri, and Kelvin Design, presents Homecoming/Eventually, an exhibition by Nontawat Numbenchapol and Ryan Villamael, curated by Loredana Pazzini-Paracciani. The exhibit will open virtually on 27 April 2021, Tuesday, at 6 PM. At this time of heightened national specificity, while we are compelled to reconsider the meaning of home and belonging, the exhibition Homecoming/Eventually functions as a proposition to engage, through visual art, with the contention of homecoming particularly from the geographic perspective of Southeast Asia to which a wave of ‘homecomings’ has returned millions of overseas nationals. Incidental to its interpretation as a celebratory event of returning from abroad, homecoming connotes not only physical movement but also the conceptual trajectory towards the place of origin, which is held as the return destination, culturally and emotionally. Considered within the geography and topography of memory, Homecoming/Eventually questions the meaning of home as a locality and its social relevance in relation to its return. What is home? Where is home? Is it a real or imagined place? To address these inquiries into Southeast Asian trajectories, Homecoming/Eventually presents new and ongoing works by two art practitioners from Thailand and the Philippines, Nontawat Numbenchapol and Ryan Villamael. Through mixed media, video works, and photography installations, the artists investigate the significance of home and return, engaging with the physicality of the ‘terrain’ as subjective locality of belonging. The exhibition Homecoming/Eventually will be on view virtually at the Vargas Museum’s social media channels and by appointment at the Vargas Museum until 4 June 2021. To request more information, please send an email to vargasmuseum@up.edu.ph, message the UP Vargas Museum on Facebook via https://fb.me/vargasmuseum.upd, or on Instagram or Twitter via @upvargasmuseum. You may also check our website at https://vargasmuseum.wordpress.com.

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Establishments

Day
1

Wildflour

Enjoy 5% off for dine-in transactions with a minimum spend of Php 600 at any Wildflour branch, from May 6 to 15.

Day
2

Wagyu Studio

Sign up for the Art Fair Philippines mailing list from May 6 to 15 and enjoy 20% off on Wagyu Studio classics, crowd favorites, and new dishes. You’ve never had Wagyu like this.

Day
3

Run Rabbit Run

Enjoy a 10% discount to celebrate 10 Days of Art on all orders using the Art Fair Philippines code: 10daysofart valid from May 6 to 15.

Day
4

Poison Doughnuts

Enjoy 5% off for dine-in transactions with a minimum spend of P500, from May 6 to 15, 2021.

Day
5

Yardstick Coffee

Since it summer and we all (at least at Yardstick) crave for something iced and sweet, we’re providing 10% off on our Luca the Lion Double Oat Mocha & 6L Oatly Chocolate Drink from May 6 -15. Promo code is CHOCOLOCO and is applied automatically when you checkout via www.yardstickcoffee.com. This offer is exclusive through the website only.

Day
6

Toyo Eatery / Panaderya Toyo

Mini pop-up bar at the entrance of the Alley at Karrivin Plaza.

For Php 1000.00, you have can avail of our Art Fair PH set, which consists of a choice between Toyo Eatery Pritong Suahe w/ chili coconut vinegar or a small plate of Airesano Jamón de Teruel Gran Premier D.O.P., along with 2 drinks, either our Classic Cocktail #5, a G&T, or a shot of Whiskey.

Day
7

Metiz

Exclusive Menu for Art Fair Philippines subscribers, available from May 6-15, 2021.

We will be serving it with some of our house cocktails that focus strongly on local flavors and produce by our bartender Jocel, and beers by Paco Brew (Made by Neal Oshima).

Day
8

Wantusawa

For every meal purchase, we’ll be giving one sake bomb to Art Fair subscribers.

Day
9

Prologue PH

Enjoy a 5% discount for dine-in transactions from 06 until 15 May 2021!

Day
10

Easy Peasy

In need of a scrumptious pick-me-up, have no time to cook, or simply got hit by a sudden craving? We got you covered. Enjoy 20% off on our hearty comfort food specialties by subscribing to the Art Fair Philippines e-Newsletter between May 6-15—EASY PEASY!

New

Krapow

Free Cha Yen for meals P500 and up! For dine-in transactions only.

New

CIBO

Get a FREE La Famiglia Farfalle alla Norvegese worth P725 for a minimum dine-in order of P3,000!

Stay tuned for more promos!